Engaged Learning Collection

Publication Date

4-15-2015

Abstract

This paper examines the experience of indigenous women in Costa Rica, specifically the Broran, in regards to land rights violations. Using international law on women’s rights, land rights, and indigenous rights as a backdrop, this paper coalesces qualitative research on domestic attitudes towards indigenous communities with qualitative research on the effects and response of indigenous Broran women to the experience of continued land loss. Specifically examining the experience of indigenous women in this struggle reveals women’s key role in maintaining culture in the face of land loss even in the context of an extremely place-based identity, arguing that indigenous women are essential in preventing a slow ethnocide of indigenous groups. I traveled to Costa Rica in January of 2015 in order to research this, and specifically This paper examines the experience of indigenous women in Costa Rica, specifically the Broran, in regards to land rights violations. Using international law on women’s rights, land rights, and indigenous rights as a backdrop, this paper coalesces qualitative research on domestic attitudes towards indigenous communities with qualitative research on the effects and response of indigenous Broran women to the experience of continued land loss. Specifically examining the experience of indigenous women in this struggle reveals women’s key role in maintaining culture in the face of land loss even in the context of an extremely place-based identity, arguing that indigenous women are essential in preventing a slow ethnocide of indigenous groups.

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Costa Rica, indigenous, women, ethnocide, land rights, Broran, Terraba

Part of

Engaged Learning Collection

Rights

© 2015 by Michelle Anderson

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