Title

Are Banks Still Special When There is a Secondary Market for Loans?

Publication Date

1-2-2006

Abstract

When a borrowing firm's existing loans trade for the first time in the secondary loan market, it elicits a significant positive stock price response by the borrowing firm's equity investors. We show that underlying this response is the impact of loan sales in alleviating a borrowing firm's financial constraints. In particular, we show in a differences-in-differences framework that firms that are smaller, younger, without a bond rating or that are distressed are more likely to benefit from loan sales as compared to other borrowers. We also find that new loan announcements are associated with a positive stock price announcement effect even when prior loans made to the same borrower already trade on the secondary market. Overall, we conclude that the role of banks, in terms of their specialness to borrowers, has changed due to their ability to create an active secondary loan market while simultaneously maintaining their traditional specialness as monitors and information producers for outside agents.

Document Type

Article

Keywords

alleviation of financial constraints, bank loans, monitoring, risk-shifting, stocks

Disciplines

Finance

Source

SMU Cox: Finance (Topic)

Language

English

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