Engaged Learning Collection

Contributor(s)

Dr. Andy Liu

Publication Date

4-15-2014

Abstract

Many methods used to calculate x-ray flux are incapable of accounting for the high x-ray flux generated by modern x-ray machines. The most common method utilized today for monitoring x-ray dose rate in real time, by ionizing gas chambers, is usable for modern devices but is technically complex. The construction of a gas chamber is not a simple task, and its large size necessitates gas tubing, high voltages, signal cables, and other specialized parts and services to operate. The ionization approach is impractical for certain applications, such as when radiation dose must be measured in confined spaces. Advances in the technology of silicon PIN diodes in the datacom and telecom industries allow for the development of an inexpensive and compact solid-state ionizing sensor to calculate x-ray flux. As x-ray photons flux through the diodes, the photoelectric effect produces a photocurrent (1). The x-ray flux can be determined from this current, and once the former is known the radiation dose can be calculated from it.

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Engaged Learning 2014, x-ray detector, silicon PIN diode, circuit

Disciplines

Physics

Extent

19 pages

Format

.pdf

Rights

The files in this collection are protected by copyright law. No commercial reproduction or distribution of these files is permitted without the written permission of Southern Methodist University, Cox Business School. These files may be freely used for educational purposes, provided they are not altered in any way, and Southern Methodist University is cited. For more information, contact ncds@smu.edu.

Language

English

Included in

Physics Commons

Share

COinS