Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this pilot randomized controlled trial was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an audio-recorded mindfulness-based physical activity intervention as compared to an active control condition. I also examined affective response and distress tolerance during exercise as two putative mediators of the intervention. Methods: Community participants (N = 50) were randomized to a mindfulness intervention or active control group. Results: The audio-recorded mindfulness-based physical activity intervention was acceptable (i.e., well liked, M = 7.94, SD = 1.67) and feasible (i.e., percentage of use, M = 83.94%, SD = 20.65%). The intervention also resulted in greater self-reported moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) minutes at one-week follow-up for participants in the mindfulness condition (M = 277.96, SD = 167.57) than participants in the control condition (M = 210.80, SD = 90.03), reflecting a moderate size effect (χ2= 3.80, d = .45, p= .05). Neither affective response during exercise nor distress tolerance during exercise mediated the relationship between condition and MVPA. Conclusion: The audio-recorded mindfulness-based physical activity intervention is a feasible, acceptable, and potentially efficacious approach to help individuals increase physical activity.

Degree Date

8-2020

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Austin Baldwin

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Number of Pages

67

Format

PDF

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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