Abstract

Physical and psychological IPV often co-occur, and are both potential risk factors for child adjustment problems; however, their joint relation with child adjustment problems is not well understood. The current study examined whether previous physical IPV augmented the relation between current psychological IPV and child threat appraisals and child internalizing symptoms. Participants were 506 children aged 7-10 (Mage = 8.49; 48% female) and their mothers (Mage = 36.32) recruited from the community. Children reported on IPV between mothers and mothers’ partners, child threat appraisals, and child internalizing symptoms. Mothers reported on child internalizing symptoms. Previous physical IPV, conceptualized based on its frequency, diminished the relation between current psychological IPV and child threat appraisals, but did not interact with current psychological IPV to predict mother- or child-reported internalizing symptoms. In exploratory analyses, previous physical IPV, conceptualized based on its harmfulness, diminished the relation between current psychological IPV and child threat appraisals. In addition, physical and psychological IPV exhibited additive effects with child-reported internalizing symptoms. The findings suggests that researchers, clinicians, and legal service providers should consider the unique risk posed by physical and psychological IPV, as well as the moderating role of contextual factors.

Degree Date

Winter 12-19-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

Advisor

Ernest Jouriles

Second Advisor

George Holden

Third Advisor

Renee McDonald

Fourth Advisor

David Rosenfield

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Number of Pages

81

Format

.pdf

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Available for download on Thursday, November 30, 2023

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