Abstract

This article presents the story of Doreen, a client represented by the SMU Civil Clinic in a suit against her to collect a consumer debt. My goal in sharing Doreen's story here is two-fold. First, it is to provide an example of how our work with students and our clients can shift from representation to research to advocacy and back again. My second goal is to encourage others-students, clinic supervisors, fellows and faculty-to consider the work they do and its potential to improve the quality of justice in communities, to enhance the delivery of legal services, and to promote economic and social justice, goals that are at the heart of the Bellow Scholar program.Part I considers Doreen's story as a story of representation in a law school clinic. Part II considers her story as a basis for developing a research project exploring issues raised by the representation. It also reflects on the process of conducting the project and contains a brief summary of the results. Part III shows how, even before the project was complete, its results could be used to highlight some of the problems facing consumers like Doreen and begin to provide a basis for education and reform. It also describes how research can be used as part of a curriculum with clinic students. Finally, Part IV reflects on the Bellow Scholar program's contribution to the work of clinical teachers, their students and clients, and the communities in which they live.

Publication Title

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Publication Date

2012

Document Type

Article

Included in

Law Commons

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